Dengue Fever

//Dengue Fever
  • Dengue symptoms

OVERVIEW

Dengue is a severe illness, similar to a high fever or flu. Commonly known as ‘Breakbone Fever’, Dengue fever is a mosquito-borne infection caused by four different viruses, which are all spread by a particular type of mosquito (Aedes Aegypti, or occasionally Aedes Albopictus).

Dengue fever can occur in varying levels of severity; right from mild fevers and body aches to the more sever forms, which include Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever (DHF) and Dengue Shock Syndrome (DSS). Normally, the flu-like illness can be treated at home, after consulting a Doctor or medical professional. However, the more serious form of the fever usually results in patients having to be hospitalised for 5-10 days.

The most common symptoms of Dengue fever include a moderate fever of (around 104ºF – 105º F), irritation or rashes occurring on the skin, and body pain (severe headaches, joint aches and muscle pains). Breakbone Fever, or Dandy Fever, results in an unusually severe amount of muscle and joint pain that affect the patient’s ability to walk or rest comfortably. In efforts to reduce the pain, patients are forced to resort to exaggerated postures and walking styles.

IS THERE A DENGUE VACCINE?

In April 2016, Sanofi Pasteur received WHO approval for Dengvaxia (CYD-TDV), a live recombinant tetravalent vaccine for Dengue fever. The vaccine is the result of a combined twenty years of collaboration, innovation and scientific achievement. They conducted 25 clinical studies in 15 different countries, with over 40,000 volunteers participating in Phases I – III of the program, and 29,000 of them receiving the vaccine. By October 4, Sanofi Pasteur had received as many as 11 marketing approvals, out of which 4 had been granted by WHO-recognised Regulatory Authorities. So far, the vaccine has received approval in Mexico, The Philippines, Brazil, El Salvador, Costa Rica, Paraguay, Guatemala, Peru, Indonesia, Thailand and Singapore.

In India, there has been a reluctance in giving the vaccine the green light. Dr Soumya Swaminathan, Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR), Director, said, “It would be a very pre-mature decision to introduce this vaccine in India. We are still not convinced about the data on the baseline sero-type immunity for dengue in India. Data says when a person, with pre-existing immunity, is vaccinated he develops anti-bodies against the disease.”

For more information, please refer to our ‘Is There A Dengue Vaccine?’ section below.

CAUSES OF DENGUE FEVER

Dengue fever is contracted from the bite of a particular species of mosquito, after it has bitten an already infected individual. The Aedes Aegypti mosquito, identified by its visible stripes, thrives during the Monsoon, as the rains create ample breeding grounds for these insects. However, the risk in not contained to the rainy season as these mosquitoes are capable of breeding in any form of stagnant water, such as flower pots, plastic tarpaulin or bags, and soda cans, all through the year. A single bite is all it takes to infect an individual and cause the illness.

 The only way to contract Dengue fever is through a mosquito bite. It is not contagious, and cannot directly be spread from one individual to another.

It is important to note that the virus is not contagious, and hence will not spread directly from one individual to another. Dengue fever is completely mosquito-borne, meaning there has to exist a common mosquito carrying the virus from the infected individual to the healthy one. The entire life cycle of the virus is based on the mosquito acting as the transmitter, or vector, and the individual acting as the source of infection being spread.

An infected mosquito remains so for the entirety of its life span, and can proceed to infect multiple individuals. Due to the high number of viruses present in an infected individual’s blood, especially prior to the typical symptoms developing, it is possible to infect the mosquito. These viruses are part of the ‘Flaviviridae’ family, and possess an RNA strand as its genetic makeup. Virologists have officially termed the Dengue virus stereotypes as DENV 1-4. Despite the four stereotypes being closely related, there exists enough antigenic differences between them to bypass human antibodies. This means that developing an immunity to one stereotype does not protect you from risk of infection from any of the other three stereotypes.

The 4 primary Dengue stereotypes, namely DEN-1, DEN-2, DEN-3, DEN-4, that can infect an individual with Dengue fever. All of these 4 viruses are spread by the striped Aedes Aegypti mosquito, and occasionally by the Aedes Albopictus mosquito. Originally from Africa, the Aedes Aegypti can currently be found spread across the world’s tropical zones, and thrives on breeding in close proximity to populated areas.

Unlike ordinary diseases, the body is unable to develop an immunity to it after the first incidence of contracting it. It is very important to remember; if you have previously contracted Dengue fever, not only is it possible to contract it again but there also exists heightened risk of developing a more severe form of the illness.

Herbal Mosquito Repellent Room Spray

180.00

  • 100% Herbal Mosquito Repellent Room Spray

  • Contains ZERO harmful chemicals, like “Deet”

  • Eliminates mosquitos in a 10 day treatment process

  • Non toxic, eco friendly and made from lemongrass and tulsi

SHOP NOW

HIGH-RISK AREAS FOR DENGUE INFECTION

Estimates show that there are currently 2.5 billion people, which accounts for 40% of the world population, living in areas where there exists a risk of contracting Dengue fever. The illness is transmitted by Aedes Aegypti and Aedes Albopictus mosquitoes, which are found throughout the world. The Dengue fever endemic is prevalent in over 100 countries, across Asia, Africa, the Caribbean, the Americas and the Pacific.

Most commonly found in subtropical and tropical areas, Dengue fever has a tendency to occur in a wide range of areas. In the US, majority of Dengue fever outbreaks have been restricted to areas such as Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Samoa, and Guam, which have been declared to be endemic for the virus. Dengue fever shares a similar geographical prevalence as other mosquito-borne illnesses like Malaria and Yellow Fever, and has now grown to be the leading cause of Acute Febrile Illness in travellers returning to the US from Asia, South America and the Caribbean islands.

In India, data provided by the National Vector Born Disease Control Program (NVBDCP) showed that 111,880 cases of Dengue fever, with as many as 227 cases proving fatal, were reported in 2016. As of July 2017, there have been slightly over 18,700 cases reported in India. This reduced rate has been thanks to effective measures, such as Union Health Minister J.P. Nadda’s urging of aggressive awareness campaigns on the dangers of vector-borne diseases, and how to prevent it from spreading.

As of July 2017, Kerala has reported the highest number of cases with over 9,10, followed by Tamil Nadu with over 4,100. Based on official figures provided by the ministry, Karnataka had reported over 1,950 cases, while Gujarat reported 620, Andhra Pradesh 610 and West Bengal 470, among other states. India has also been prone to other vector-borne diseases, with close to 11,000 Chikungunya cases being reported, with Karnataka being the highest at over 4,050 cases.

Dengue fever is most commonly contracted in the following high-risk areas –

  • Central America – Costa Rica, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Panama, Puerto Rico.
  • South America – Argentina (North), Bolivia, Brazil, Guyana, Paraguay, Venezuela.
  • The Caribbean Islands – Barbados, Dominican Republic, Jamaica, Suriname, Trinidad.
  • Tropical Asia -India, Bangladesh, Cambodia, China, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Micronesia, Pakistan, Paraguay, Philippines, Samoa, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Taiwan, Thailand, Vietnam.

Unlike Malaria, Dengue fever is not more prevalent in lesser affluent areas. The risk of contracting the illness is certainly higher in rural areas, but it is by no means restricted to these economically weak segments of society.

Here are a few World Health Organisation (WHO) statistics on Dengue fever:

  • Approximately two-fifths of the entire world population (2.5 billion people) are currently exposed to Dengue fever and face the risk of contracting it on a daily basis.
  • Dengue fever has been declared as endemic in over 100 countries.
  • In many Asian countries, the leading cause of severe illnesses, or fatal illnesses, among children is most commonly Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever.
  • 2007 saw close to 890,000 reported cases of Dengue fever across the Americas, with almost 26,000 cases of it developing into DHF.
  • People who have not been exposed to Dengue fever in the past face an infection rate of 40-50% during epidemics, however that rate is capable of increasing to almost 90% in certain circumstances.
  • Approximately 500,000 people suffering from Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever are hospitalised every year, with many of these patients being children. The burden of this sever illness is often too much to bear, resulting in around 2.5% of these patients being unable to survive.
  • The rate of Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever fatalities may exceed 20% if the illness is not treated correctly. However, having proper access to medical care, with Doctors being aware of how to treat Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever, results in a significant reduction in the rate of fatalities. In these cases, the death rate reduces to less than 1%.
  • Estimates show that there are close to 22,000 deaths occurring every year, with the majority of victims being children.

In recent years, the illness has caused a fair number of outbreaks across the world –

  • In 2011, a large number of cases of Dengue fever were reported in Bolivia, Brazil, Columbia, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Honduras, Mexico, Peru, Puerto Rico, and Venezuela, with Paraguay suffering the worst outbreak of Dengue fever since 2007. The outbreak resulted in severe overcrowding of hospitals, and disruptions in scheduled surgeries and procedures.
  • In 2013, Thailand reported its worst dengue outbreak in over 20 years, with 126 fatalities amongst the 135,344 people infected with the virus, in the month of October.
  • In 2015, the American Samoa saw 370 cases of Dengue fever between May and September, with over 130 patients requiring hospitalisation.
  • In September 2015, a large outbreak of Dengue fever in New Delhi, India, resulted in 1,872 individuals testing positive for the sever illness.
  • In 2015, two non-native species of mosquitoes were found in California, including the Aedes Aegypti mosquito, capable of transmitting Dengue fever. However, there were fortunately no immediate cases being reported. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that since 1980, a few cases of Dengue fever have been confirmed along the Texas-Mexico border, primarily due to large outbreaks occurring in neighbouring Mexican cities at the time.

HOW TO PREVENT DENGUE

In order to prevent the illness, it is important to prevent the initial transmission of the virus from patients to mosquitoes. As a precautionary measure, a Dengue fever patient must remain under some form of protective mosquito netting for long enough to circumvent the risk. The second spell of fever breaking usually serves as an indicator that the patient is no longer capable of transmitting the virus to a mosquito that bites them.

On a larger scale, the prevention of Dengue fever heavily relies on the control over mosquito infestations and the effective eradication of their potential breeding grounds. In countries that face a high risk of infection, numerous Government initiatives are taken to properly dispose of stagnant water but these measures are difficult to enforce effectively.

Research has shown that the Aedes Aegypti mosquito is most active in the hours surrounding sunrise and sunset, so it is recommended to take extra precautions during these hours of the day. However, the mosquito may still bite at any time of the day and proper care must consistently be taken in certain areas.


There are numerous ways to reduce the risk of infection –


Mosquito Repellents & Nets
Avoiding mosquito bites is obviously the safest way to reduce the risk of contracting Dengue fever. Use a herbal mosquito repellent for the personal health and safety of yourself and your loved ones, as well as mosquito traps and nets. Sleeping with a mosquito net greatly reduces the risk of infection, so it is recommended to do so.

Just Spray by Herbal Strategi

When using Just Spray, it is important to use it correctly in order to maximise the benefits of your safe, environmentally-friendly mosquito repellent. Here are a few tips to follow –

  • For the first 3 to 5 days spray ten shots in the air, inside crevices, underneath and behind all beds, cupboards and curtains.
  • When spraying, ensure the fan and air conditioner are switched off, and the windows and doors are kept closed during, and for 20 minutes after you’re done. Please ensure that there are no infants or children in the room when doing so!
  • From Day 4 – 6, spray three shots in the air, and one or two shots under the bed every day.
  • Thoroughly spray under all of the furniture at home. While spraying, ensure that the spray nozzle in pointed upwards so that the repellant makes contact with the base of the furniture, rather than the floor.

Scents
Mosquitos are attracted to heavily-scented perfumes and soaps so they must be used sparingly.

Personal Attire
By reducing the amount of exposed skin, the likelihood of getting bitten reduces as well. Ensure to always wear full-length shirts and pants, as well as socks and shoes for additional protection against mosquito bites.

Windows & Doors
There are many effective Mesh Screens or Nets available to reinforce your windows against mosquitos.

Stagnant Waterbodies
The Aedes mosquito generally tends to breed in bodies of clear, stagnant water. Remember to regularly dispose of all forms of stagnant water, to ensure that the mosquitos are unable to breed.

  • Turn over any water buckets or watering cans, and ensure they are stored indoors where no stagnant water accumulate and form.
  • Drain potted plant plates by scrubbing them thoroughly, to dispose of any mosquito eggs present.
  • Prevent puddles from developing on harder soil surfaces by maintaining looser soil in pots.
  • Similar to potted plants, flower vases must be regularly cleaned and rinsed out.
  • Larger leaves of plants are often breeding grounds as they accumulate water and form puddles of stagnant water.
  • Be wary of any pools of water collecting beside air-conditioning units.

Here are a few general rules, outlined by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, to help prevent the transfer of mosquito-borne viruses and other pathogens –

  • Avoid Infected Areas: To the best of your ability, avoid known focus areas of any known epidemic. For outbreak alerts and more information on regional disease transmission patterns, take a look at the CDC Travelers’ Health web page (http://www.cdc.gov/travel).
  • Avoid Peak Exposure Times: A slight change in routine can help reduce exposure to mosquitos as their peak hours are around the hours of sunrise and sunset. Dengue fever is spread throughout daylight hours, but the risk of infection is always highest closer to dawn or dusk.
  • Wear Full Sleeve Clothing: As mentioned earlier, the likelihood of getting bitten reduces when reducing the amount of exposed skin. Ensure to always wear full-length shirts and pants, as well as socks and shoes for additional protection against mosquito bites.
  • Use Protective Repellants: Make use of non-harmful, herbal mosquito repellants that protect the individual from the risk of infection and more.

Mospray by Herbal Strategi

When using Mospray, it is important to use it correctly in order to maximise the benefits of your safe, environmentally-friendly mosquito repellent. Here are a few tips to follow –

  • Shake the bottle well before use.
  • Spray liberally, approximately 6-8 inches away from your exposed skin.
  • Using your palm, spread evenly.
  • Do not attempt to apply directly on the face. Instead, spray on your palm and then spread evenly on face, ears and neck.
  • The product is water-based, and hence can even be sprayed directly onto clothes as it doesn’t stain.

SYMPTOMS & DIAGNOSIS OF DENGUE FEVER

Symptoms of Dengue Fever

There are numerous symptoms of Dengue fever, and they vary according to the severity of the infection.

The symptoms normally begin between 4-15 days of the initial bite, with the incubation period of Dengue fever typically being between 4-7 days. In majority of cases, the infection lasts for anything between 3-10 days, with the exception of more severe cases that could possibly last longer.

Your platelets are the cells that circulate within our bloodstream, binding together when any damaged blood vessels are identified, causing a blood clot.

Dengue fever is known to cause a dangerously low platelet count, which can result in the illness escalating to a higher level of severity. Regular, healthy platelet count ranges from 150,000 to 450,000 platelets per microliter of blood.

A Dengue fever patient could see this platelet count decrease to 40,000-50,000, or even lower. Despite the subsiding of symptoms, such as fever, it is very important to continue monitoring the patient’s platelet count until it stabilises and begins to rise. Platelet counts below 20,000 faces a higher chance of developing severe bleeding complications, as seen in cases of Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever.

Mild Dengue Fever

Symptoms of Dengue fever take up to 7 days to reveal themselves, after the bite, and normally subside after a week or so. These more common, milder forms of the illness rarely result in serious, sometimes fatal complications. The symptoms of Mild Dengue Fever include:

  • Muscle & Joint aches and pains
  • High Temperature (up to 104º F)
  • Body rashes
  • Sever headache
  • Sharp pain present behind the eyes
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Loss of appetite

Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever (DHF)

Initially, the symptoms are similar to the mild fever before gradually worsening over the next week. In cases where it is not treated in time, DHF can prove fatal. Aside from the above-mentioned milder symptoms, the symptoms of DHF include:

  • Mouth & Gum bleeding
  • Nose bleeding
  • Severely damaged blood vessels and lymph vessels
  • Lowered blood Platelet Count
  • Dark coloured vomit or feces, indicating internal bleeding
  • Sensitive digestion
  • Weakened pulse
  • Clammy skin

Dengue Shock Syndrome (DSS)

As the most severe form of Dengue fever, patients face a high risk of fatality in the case of DSS. Aside from the above-mentioned milder symptoms, the symptoms of DHF include:

  • Severe pain in the stomach
  • Hypotension, or rapid decrease in blood pressure
  • Excessive bleeding
  • Severe vomiting
  • Feeling of disorientation
  • Leaking blood vessels
  • Death

FACTS ON DENGUE

  • Dengue fever is a disease caused by a family of viruses, exclusively transmitted through mosquito bites.
  • The symptoms of Dengue fever include high fever, severe joint and muscle pain, headaches, swollen lymph nodes, exhaustion, and bodily rashes. The ‘Dengue Triad’ is the term given to any patient simultaneously suffering of fever, rashes, and a headache.
  • Dengue infections are prevalent throughout the tropics and subtropics.
  • Dengue fever is caused by a virus, which is why there isn’t any specific antibiotic or medicine that can be used to treat it. Typical Dengue fever treatment is symptomatic, and is directed towards relief of symptoms.
  • Fever and Muscle Pain marks the acute phase of the illness, which usually lasts between 1-2 weeks.
  • Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever (DHF) is a more severe syndrome that normally affects children under 10 years of age. This serious complication of Dengue fever causes abdominal pain, excess haemorrhaging, and circulatory collapse (shock).
  • The prevention of Dengue fever completely depends on the control and / or eradication of the mosquitoes carrying the virus.
  • In April 2016, a vaccine for dengue fever was approved for use in Dengue-endemic areas.

HOW DO YOU TREAT DENGUE FEVER?

Dengue fever is a virus, without any specific cure available to treat it, but there are ways in which the patient’s symptoms can be eased, depending on how severe the illness has become. Doctors will provide Mild Dengue fever patients with the following:

  • Rehydration – Dengue virus causes severe fevers and vomiting, that can gravely dehydrate the patient’s body. It is important to drink clean, purified water and to avoid anything other than mineral water. Patients are also recommended to use rehydration salts, which are very effective at replacing vital minerals and fluids in the body.
  • Painkillers – Dengue patients suffer from intense muscle and joint pain, resulting in the need for painkillers to help reduce body temperature and ease body pain. Patients are recommended to use paracetamol, acetaminophen or codeine instead of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, like Aspirin or Ibuprofen, to reduce the risk of internal bleeding and haemorrhages.

Once the Dengue fever progresses to a more severe form, Doctors will provide patients with the following:

  • Intravenous Fluid Supplementation (IV Drip) – Patients who are unable to consume fluids orally will be administered an IV Drip, to ensure they receive their necessary fluids.
  • Blood Transfusion – Doctors may suggest a blood transfusion for severely dehydrated patients.
  • Hospitalisation – If Dengue fever becomes severe, individuals must be admitted to the hospital so they can be properly treated and monitored.

The numerous cases of Dengue fever recently reported in numerous parts of India has resulted in the discovery of many effective home remedies and treatments of symptoms. Here are a collection of the best ones –

  • Papaya Leaf Juice – This certain remedy greatly helps in increasing the body’s platelet count and reducing many of the symptoms of Dengue fever, such as body pains, chills, fatigue, low energy and nausea. The Papaya Leaves can be crushed and consumed, or can be had as a drink in the form of a papaya leaf juice, which is very helpful in flushing out toxins.
  • Giloy – A very important herb in Ayurveda, Giloy helps the body in maintaining its metabolic rate, strengthening its immune system, and protecting itself against infections. It is recommended to boil the Giloy stems, to be served as a herbal drink. A few Tulsi leaves may also be added to the drink.
  • Fenugreek Leaves – Known to ease fevers, Fenugreek Leaves have a sedative property that’s useful in reducing pain, thus helping patients to sleep more comfortably. The leaves can be soaked in water and consumed, or you can mix some Methi powder into it before consuming.
  • Goldenseal – The dried root of Goldenseal is very useful in the making of medicines and remedies. Similar to Papaya Leaf Juice, it has the ability to provide quick relief from many symptoms of Dengue and eliminate the virus from the body, and can be consumed in the same way; either by crushing and chewing, or by juicing it.
  • Turmeric – Known to boost the body’s metabolism, Turmeric quickens the healing process. It can be consumed along with milk.
  • Tulsi Leaves and Black Pepper – By boiling Tulsi Leaves, and adding about 2g of Black Pepper to it, it is possible to make a remedy that builds your body’s immunity and doubles as an antibacterial element.

Majority of time, the prognosis for Dengue fever is quite positive, as this viral disease is self-limited and can be tackled with adequate hydration, pain control and rest. The worst symptoms of Dengue fever usually last between 1-2 weeks, with majority of patients making a complete recovery in a few weeks.

In regular cases, Dengue fever has a Mortality Rate of less than 1% amongst all recorded cases, while Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever proves to be fatal in 2.5% of cases. If not treated properly, DHF Mortality Rates can rise to as high as 20-50%.

IS THERE A DENGUE VACCINE?

For many years, doctors and medical caregivers have struggled to control the number of individuals affected by Dengue fever across the world. In April 2016, the hopes for a vaccine rekindled as the World Health Organisation approved Sanofi Pasteur’s Dengvaxia (CYD-TDV), a live recombinant tetravalent vaccine for Dengue fever.

A world leader in human vaccines, Sanofi Pasteur has produced a portfolio of high quality vaccines, and provides more than a billion doses of vaccines every year. This is what allows them to immunise over 500 million people across the world, each year.

Administered as a 3-dose series, Dengvaxia is provided to patients, between 9 – 45 years of age, who have travelled to areas where Dengue fever is endemic. The clinical trials conducted in Asia and Latin America were proven successful, as Dengvaxia effectively protected 66% of 40,000 children and adolescent patients observed. More importantly, Dengvaxia proved extremely effective at protecting against more severe forms of Dengue fever, which can even be fatal in some cases. The Dengvaxia managed to prevent 93% of severe cases, and resulted in an 80% reduction in Dengue-related hospitalisations. Since then, numerous other Dengue vaccines have been undergoing clinical trials, but none have yet been approved for commercial use.

Sanofi Pasteur’s vaccine is the result of a combined twenty years of collaboration, innovation and scientific achievement. They conducted 25 clinical studies in 15 different countries, with over 40,000 volunteers participating in Phases I – III of the program, and 29,000 of them receiving the vaccine. By October 4, Sanofi Pasteur had received as many as 11 marketing approvals, out of which 4 had been granted by WHO-recognised Regulatory Authorities. So far, the vaccine has received approval in Mexico, The Philippines, Brazil, El Salvador, Costa Rica, Paraguay, Guatemala, Peru, Indonesia, Thailand and Singapore.

“We’re pleased to see the growing medical and public health recognition for the vaccine,” says Sanofi Pasteur’s Head of Global Medical Affairs, MD, Su Peing Ng. “With this new tool in hand, public health communities in dengue-endemic countries now have additional means to achieve the WHO objectives for 50% reduction in mortality and 25% reduction in morbidity due to dengue by 2020.”

In India, there has been a reluctance in giving the vaccine the green light. Dr Soumya Swaminathan, Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR), Director, said, “It would be a very pre-mature decision to introduce this vaccine in India. We are still not convinced about the data on the baseline sero-type immunity for dengue in India. Data says when a person, with pre-existing immunity, is vaccinated he develops anti-bodies against the disease.”

The Government of India announced that it is currently awaiting post-marketing surveillance data from other countries. Health experts say that the population must achieve at least 50% sero-type immunity in order to introduce the vaccine, and the ICMR and National Vector Borne Disease Control Programme (NVBDCP) data currently available is insufficient.

HISTORY OF DENGUE

An endemic in tropical and subtropical areas, Dengue fever is now estimated to be the cause behind 50-100 million infections per year across the world, according to World Health Organisation (WHO) statistics. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Dengue fever as the primary cause of acute febrile illnesses in travellers returning to the US from tropical and subtropical areas.

In 1789, B. Rush recorded the first clinical report of Dengue fever, but it is believed that the Chinese described an illness as the ‘disease associated with flying insects’, as early as 420 AD. In African cultures, the physically distorting disease was said to be caused by an evil spirit, and was described as ‘ka dinga pepo’. Experts say that the Spanish later changed the African term ‘dinga’ to ‘dengue’, as it translates to fastidious or careful in Spanish, accurately describing the way in which Dengue patients gingerly walk through the sever body pain.

In recent years, Dengue fever has seen an upsurge in the number of cases across the world. Research suggests that certain socio-economic factors could be linked to the global increase in Dengue fever outbreaks:

  • An increase in Urban development results in more sites for mosquitoes to breed and develop
  • International commerce, containing infected mosquitoes, thus introducing the disease to uncontaminated areas.
  • Global Environmental changes, allowing mosquitos to survive through the steadily warming Winter months.
  • Travellers who visit highly infected areas, and then carry the disease back overseas to areas where mosquitoes have not been previously infected.

According to the WHO Distribution Map, Dengue has spread widely throughout the world, with a concentration in tropical and subtropical areas. More recently, it has been detected in the US, India, Philippines, Taiwan, Samoa, Brazil, Puerto Rico, Costa Rica, and Thailand.

In India, data provided by the National Vector Born Disease Control Program (NVBDCP) showed that 111,880 cases of Dengue fever, with as many as 227 cases proving fatal, were reported in 2016. As of July 2017, there have been slightly over 18,700 cases reported in India. This reduced rate has been thanks to effective measures, such as Union Health Minister J.P. Nadda’s urging of aggressive awareness campaigns on the dangers of vector-borne diseases, and how to prevent it from spreading.

As of July 2017, Kerala has reported the highest number of cases with over 9,10, followed by Tamil Nadu with over 4,100. Based on official figures provided by the ministry, Karnataka had reported over 1,950 cases, while Gujarat reported 620, Andhra Pradesh 610 and West Bengal 470, among other states. India has also been prone to other vector-borne diseases, with close to 11,000 Chikungunya cases being reported, with Karnataka being the highest at over 4,050 cases.

Disclaimer

The opinions expressed within this article are the personal opinions of the author, based on available information. Herbal Strategi cannot be held responsible for the accuracy, completeness, suitability, or validity of any information presented in this article.

We, at Herbal Strategi, strongly urge any individuals suspicious of having Dengue fever to go and consult a doctor or medical professional immediately.

By | 2018-10-09T12:03:12+00:00 August 17th, 2017|Herbal Repellents|0 Comments

About the Author:

Leave A Comment